Funded Research

Identifying Interactors of Sanpodo Essential for Notch-Mediated Asymmertric Divisions in Drosophila Nervous System
Principal Investigator(s):
Status:
Completed
Center(s):
  • McDonnell Pediatric Cancer Center
Award Mechanism:
Postdoctoral Fellowship
Project Period:
2/1/2007 - 1/31/2009
Total Amount:
$40,000
Collaborators:
James Skeath

The aim of this project is to identify genes that act with sanpodo during asymmetric divisions. We believe that a detailed characterization of these factors will reveal basic clues into how Sanpodo promotes Notch activity. As there is not a clear idea of the mechanism by which Sanpodo promotes Notch signaling any insight into this issue is of broad relevance. Given the central role of Notch/Numb-mediated asymmetric divisions during mammalian CNS development and that deregulation of Notch signaling may cause a number of brain tumors, understanding the molecular events that normally control this signaling pathway may allow us to better understand the etiology of specific tumors and thus afford opportunities to diagnose and treat these tumors more effectively.

Project Update:

Notch/Numb-mediated asymmetric divisions during mammalian CNS development and that deregulation of Notch signaling results in a number of brain tumors. Therefore, understanding the molecular events that normally control this signaling pathway may allow us to better understand the etiology of specific tumors and thus afford opportunities to diagnose and treat these tumors more effectively. The aim of this project is to identify genes that act with Sanpodo, a regulator of Notch signaling, during asymmetric divisions of the neuroblasts. The investigators believe that a detailed characterization of these factors will reveal basic clues into how Sanpodo promotes Notch activity. As there is not a clear idea of the mechanism by which Sanpodo promotes Notch signaling, any insight into this issue is of broad relevance. Since the inception of this fellowship, a genetic modifier screen was initiated and some potential candidates were successfully identified. Currently, the investigators are focusing their research towards molecular characterization of how these genes regulate Sanpodo-dependent Notch signaling.